Photos of Tempest Installations

even a grounded mast will create static charge during thunderstorms. I think it would be even more!

A grounded mast is saver, as when lightning hits it, the current will flow mostly through the thick wire (copper strip?), instead of through the wooden post, possibly setting it on fire.

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Grounding eliminates potential that can build up on unbonded conductors/ariels.

During a very active thunderstorm, static activity along the highest and pointiest/corners/etc can be quite high. A direct strike will definitely result in burnouts/damage whether there is a ground or not. If the ground is inadequate it will just “smoke” just like a fuse and the excess kinetic energy finds it way, often with catastrophic consequences/destruction.

A completely ungrounded wooden post is the worst. Splinterville!

Insurance claims are a certainty with a direct dwelling strike due to the amount of damage.

Many electronics can be damaged permanently even with a strike to power lines miles away particularly if the wiring/grounding is poor. If there is no good path at the demarc and flashovers occur to conductors/feeders at points other than designed they are often huge and loud! Very destructive currents will be realized further downstream often far in excess of the capacity of surge protection. If you’ve heard a ‘pop’ noise inside your home when lightning flashes nearby you have witness this phenomenon. The standard flashover voltage is 6.6kV in an electric panel. This assumes the panel is properly installed and bonded of course. Even still, the 6.6kV has to be dealt with and most device power supplies have MOVs that can handle it. Of course they are limited by the number of times this happens.

I’ve seen improperly installed telephony equipment where so much kinetic energy was sent down 100 pair cables that every bend or twist in the cable had its outer jacket broken up or holed like a bullet was inside breaking out! Even worse, the wallboard was black with flame marks and copper plating from molten conductors. All of that happens in a flash literally. Definitely don’t want to be in the closet when that happens!

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my point was that when the bottom of a thundercloud is positively charged, electrons will be drawn to the top of the mast, even better when grounded (infinite supply of electrons). This causes a build up of static electricity in the top. As much that it ionizes the air around it. (sometimes even visible in the form of St. Elmo’s fire). This makes the air more conductive, and it creates small feelers towards the sky, thereby attracting the lightning.

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Here you go, install these and kill two birds with one stone!
That is you have bird and lightning mitigation! :wink:

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Excited to finally say that I joined the clan… 1st installation was on a tree stake (picture) subsequently, I have extended the height with a fence top bar per recommendations. Teething problems with the unit calibration on collecting rain so once I have the replacement I will be golden. Install was a breeze, amazed at the distance I can place the unit away from the house and love love love the design !..

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lovely picture :smiley: :smiley: !

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Got my unit about a month ago, and originally had it mounted on a 5’ PVC pole attached to the eave of the house. However, I ended up getting false rain readings from wind movement, so I moved it down until I could get a steadier pole installed. Since that, though, the readings here have been exactly the same, so I don’t see a need to raise it back up!

The weathercam footage is still spectacular even without the added 5 feet.

https://www.wunderground.com/dashboard/pws/KFLTAMPA575

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Just curious what cam you are using.

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It’s a Unifi G3-Flex cam. Based on its location and use, I’ve turned off the IR and night mode settings.

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Only wish it was WiFi

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Two photos. Temporary location until snow is off roof and approx zoomed view of final location on house vent (that’s sea fog from cold air temp and “warm” water temp)

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Care to provide location or link to station data?

tweatherman

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https://tempestwx.com/station/41126

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https://tempestwx.com/station/39584/

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We’re these comments about founding the result of my set-up? I originally installed in a 10’ pvc, but it seemed t away too much. So, I thought this set-up was a better (more stable) option. Before proceeding, I contacted Tempest support to ask their ‘expert opinion. I was concerned about electrical strikes, etc. They assured me it won’t be a problem since the galvanized pipe contacts the ground. I have the email correspondence.

I really don’t want to lose my $300 device over such a thing. I’d rather go back to a shorter PVC.

Please advise further

Thank you

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most likely if the lightning ever hits the metal pole, your unit will be lost. If you want to change the pole is your choice. It also depends a bit on how often lightning hit at all in your neighborhood. If there are other, higher objects around that attract the lightning (like trees), then they reduce the chance of hitting your mast.

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Well yes, if the unit was struck by lightning :cloud_with_lightning_and_rain: I would expect it to be rendered inoperable. My question was in response to my inferring you thought it was at increased risk? And the speculative damage, another post suggested, a strike might cause to the fence post.

Now it seems to me, you are more uncertain? The tree line in the background is about 30’ linear away, and most are 4-6 times (40-60’) taller than this mounting technique. The pipe, while mounted (clamped) to the post is also imbedded a couple inches into the ground.

I suppose my question remains unanswered at this point. Thanks for the responses nevertheless.

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I’m still very sure a metal pole will attract the lightning, a pvc one doesn’t. What I cannot assess for you is how much this increased chance of lightning should effect your choice of poles. That also depends on your environment. If you are going to use a metal one, it is better to ground it.

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Perhaps I should move to roof then on a brace and just 3-4’ pvc. It’ll be higher and result in better wind capture. My only hesitation was lack of access once mounts, but it seems I may not need to access it. It’s not very clear to me how often the unit needs any maintenance. Or, perhaps I’ll see what happens as we head into spring and summer. Let it ride, as some might say. :hugs:

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normally you don’t need access. but you never know. If you can have access yourself and don’t have to hire someone to do it for you, this might be a good option.

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